Penny’s Pumpkin Ale

I love pumpkin beers. Sadly, most commercial pumpkin beers and ales contain cinnamon, to which I am quite allergic. So I decided to make my own, based off of a clone recipe for Brooklyn Brewery’s Post Road Pumpkin Ale in September 2014’s issue of Brew Your Own Magazine.

My recipe:

5 gallon partial-mash

First brewed October 12, 2014; Bottled November 8, 2014

SG 1.040; FG 1.018

Ingredients

Fermentables

  • 6.6 lbs light malt extract
  • 1/3 lb Belgian biscuit malt
  • 1 lb American 2-row pale malt
  • 1/3 lb Briess aromatic malt
  • 1 lb English medium crystal malt

Bittering

  • 1.25 oz US Fuggle hops
  • 0.25 oz Willamette hops

Yeast

  • 1 pkt Lallemand Nottingham ale yeast

Flavoring

  • 2 cans pure pumpkin puree
  • 1/2 tsp Ground nutmeg
  • 1 tsp Ground ginger
The main ingredients for my pumpkin ale. Not pictured: Hops, yeast, and spices
The main ingredients for my pumpkin ale. Not pictured: Hops, yeast, and spices

In a muslin bag (or two) place the pumpkin puree, the American 2-row pale malt, the English crystal malt, the Belgian biscuit malt, and the Briess aromatic malt.

Heat 2.5 gallons of water to 160 degrees F.

Soak muslin bag with grains and pumpkin at this temperature for one hour.

Bag of deliciousness
Bag of deliciousness

At the end of the steeping, rinse bag(s) with hot water and set aside.

Add 6.6 lbs of light malt extract and bring to a boil. Boil for 60 minutes.

Add 1 oz US Fuggles at start of boil

Add 0.25 oz US Fuggles and 0.25 oz Willamette with 15 minutes to go

At flame out, add 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg and 1 tsp ground ginger.

Stir for about 1 minute, then leave to settle for 15 minutes.

Cool with wort chiller or in a tub full of ice and water to 70 degrees F.

Just chillin' in the tub.
Just chillin’ in the tub.

Transfer wort to fermenter, top off to 5 gallons, and add yeast.

Yeast is pitched. Now the wait.
Yeast is pitched. Now the wait.

Rack at 2 weeks; bottle after two more weeks. Prime with corn sugar.

Such a lovely golden color!
Such a lovely golden color!

Two to three weeks following bottling, ale is ready to drink.

Originally based off of clone recipe for Brooklyn Brewery Post Road Pumpkin Ale in the September 2014 issue of Brew Your Own Magazine.

Published by paleololigo

Scientist (Paleontology, Geochemistry, Geology); Writer (Speculative and Science Fiction, plus technical and non-technical Science); Mom to great boy on the Autism spectrum; possessor of too many hobbies.

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