Lost with the National Museum of Brazil – Gondwanatitan – Luto #MuseuNacional

On September 2, 2018, the National Museum of Brazil (Museu Nacional) was gutted by fire. 2018 was the Museu Nacional’s 200th year. This post is one of series in which I discuss an important specimens that may have been lost to science in the blaze. Alexander Kellner and Sergio de Azevedo described a new genusContinue reading “Lost with the National Museum of Brazil – Gondwanatitan – Luto #MuseuNacional”

Lost with the National Museum of Brazil – Luzia – Luto #MuseuNacional

On September 2, 2018, the National Museum of Brazil (Museu Nacional) was gutted by fire. The loss has hit the paleontology community (and the larger museum community) hard. I will highlight over the next few days some of the many priceless specimens that have been lost. This year, the Museu Nacional celebrated its 200th year.Continue reading “Lost with the National Museum of Brazil – Luzia – Luto #MuseuNacional”

Long Distance Prospecting – #365papers – 2018 – 61

Conroy, Emerson, Anemone, and Townsend, 2012, Let your fingers do the walking: A simple spectral signature model for “remote” fossil prospecting: Journal of Human Evolution, v. 63, p. 79-84. What’s it about? The authors demonstrate the utility of satellite imagery combined with surface observations and GIS software to make predictions about where fossil localities mayContinue reading “Long Distance Prospecting – #365papers – 2018 – 61”

Plants and Animals Don’t Respond to Climate Change the Same Way – #365papers – 2018 – 54

Wing and Harrington, 2001, Floral response to rapid warming in the earliest Eocene and implications for concurrent faunal change: Paleobiology, v. 27, p. 539-563 What’s it about? The Paleocene-Eocene boundary is marked by a period of rapid global warming and co-occuring changes in mammals in response to the warming, including the appearance of seemingly dwarfedContinue reading “Plants and Animals Don’t Respond to Climate Change the Same Way – #365papers – 2018 – 54”

The Value of Fossils from the Margins of Basins – #365papers – 2018 – 53

Muldoon and Gunnell, 2012, Omomyid primates (Tarsiiformes) from the Early Middle Eocene at South Pass, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming: Journal of Human Evolution, v. 43, p. 479-511 What’s it about? Much of this paper is a description of a new species of early primate, along with a description of the primate fauna from SouthContinue reading “The Value of Fossils from the Margins of Basins – #365papers – 2018 – 53”

Migrating Marsupials of the Pleistocene – #365papers – 2018 – 44

Price, Ferguson, Webb, Feng, Higgins, Nguyen, Zhao, Joannes-Boyau, and Louys, 2017, Seasonal migration of marsupial megafauna in Pleistocene Sahul (Australia-New Guinea): Proceedings of the Royal Society B, v. 284: 20170785 What’s it about? Seasonal migrations are seen in many large mammals. In modern animals, however, such migrations are not observed in marsupials. The authors putContinue reading “Migrating Marsupials of the Pleistocene – #365papers – 2018 – 44”

Using Glass to Estimate Altitude – #365papers – 2018 – 37

Dettinger and Quade, 2015, Testing the analytical protocols and calibration of volcanic glass for the reconstruction of hydrogen isotopes in paleoprecipitation, in DeCelles, Ducea, Carrapa, and Kapp, eds., Geodynamics of a Cordilleran Orogenic System: The Central Andes of Argentina and Northern Chile: Geological Society of America Memoir 212, p. 261-276. What’s it about? Isotopes ofContinue reading “Using Glass to Estimate Altitude – #365papers – 2018 – 37”

Fossil Mammals and the Rocks that Contain them at Fossil Butte, Wyoming – #UREES270 – 2018

Gunnell, Zonneveld, and Bartels, 2016, Stratigraphy, mammalian paleontology, paleoecology, and age correlation of the Wasatch Formation, Fossil Butte National Monument, Wyoming: Journal of Paleontology, v. 90, p. 981-1011 What’s it about? This paper contains a discussion of the mammalian paleontology at Fossil Butte National Monument, Wyoming. The authors examined and identified at least 46 speciesContinue reading “Fossil Mammals and the Rocks that Contain them at Fossil Butte, Wyoming – #UREES270 – 2018”

Interpreting Cretaceous Environments from Multiple Sources – #365papers – 2018 – 32

Bojar, Csiki, and Grigorescu, 2010, Stable isotope dirstibution in Maastrichtian vertebrates and paleosols from the Hateg Basin, South Carpathians: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, v. 293, p. 329-342. What’s it about? Some late Cretaceous-aged (AKA Maastrichtian) rocks from Romania contain fossilized soils (paleosols), dinosaur bones and teeth, and dinosaur eggshells. The authors use geochemical analysis, specifically stableContinue reading “Interpreting Cretaceous Environments from Multiple Sources – #365papers – 2018 – 32”

Sabertooth, Sabertooth, How Do Your Teeth Grow? – #365papers – 2018 – 30

Feranec, 2004, Isotopic evidence of saber-tooth development, growth rate, and diet from the adult canine of Smilodon fatalis from Rancho La Brea: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, v. 206, p. 303-310. What’s it about? Sabertoothed mammals are so named because of their massive, elongate canines. A natural question to ask is, how does it get so long?Continue reading “Sabertooth, Sabertooth, How Do Your Teeth Grow? – #365papers – 2018 – 30”